About Emily Lund

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So far Emily Lund has created 6 blog entries.

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Outreach

2019-03-05T18:04:50-06:00

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Outreach

Support Groups

Hands and Voices: handsandvoices.org

Texas Hands and Voices: txhv.org

Websites

Early Language and Literacy Acquisition in Children with Hearing Loss study: www.ellastudy.org

CHLLD Lab Blog: elund40.wixsite.com/website

H&V Family Leadership in Language and Learning: www.handsandvoices.org/fl3/

Songs for Sound: songsforsound.com

Hearing First: www.hearingfirst.org

Texas Early Hearing Detection and Intervention: www.dshs.texas.gov/tehdi/

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Outreach2019-03-05T18:04:50-06:00

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Publications

2019-03-05T18:05:01-06:00

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Publications

Vocabulary Development in Children with Hearing Loss

Lund, E. (2018). Pairing new words with unfamiliar objects: Comparing children with and without cochlear implants. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 61, 2325 – 2336. Doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0467.

Lund, E., & Schuele, C. M. (2017). Word-learning performance of children with and without cochlear implants given synchronous and asynchronous cues. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 31, 777-790.

Lund, E., & Douglas, W. M. (2016). Teaching vocabulary to preschool children with hearing loss. Exceptional Children, 83, 26-41.

Lund, E., & Dinsmoor, J. (2016). Taxonomic knowledge of children with and without cochlear implants. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 47, 236-245.

Lund, E. (2016). Vocabulary knowledge of children with cochlear implants: A meta-analysis. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 21, 107-121.

Lund, E., Douglas, W. M., & Schuele, C. M. (2015). Semantic richness and word learning in children with hearing loss who are developing listening and spoken language: A single case design study. Deafness and Education International, 17, 163-175.

Lund, E., & Schuele, C. M. (2014). Effects of a word-learning training on children with cochlear implants. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 19, 68-84.

Early Literacy in Children with Hearing Loss

Bharadwaj, S., & Lund, E. (2018). Comprehension monitoring strategy intervention in children with hearing loss: A single case design study. Deafness and Education International, 20, 3-22.

Lund, E. (2017). Literacy Difficulties in the Face of Multiple Factors: Using a Team Approach. SIG 1: Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups2(1), 124-132.

Lund, E., Werfel, K., & Schuele, C. M. (2014). Phonological awareness and vocabulary performance of monolingual and bilingual preschool children with hearing loss. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 31, 85-100.

Werfel, K., Lund, E., & Schuele, C. M. (2014). Print knowledge of preschool children with hearing loss. Communication Disorders Quarterly. 36, 107-111. DOI:10.1177/1525740114539002

Parents as Teachers for Children with Hearing Loss

Lund, E. (2018). The effects of parent training on vocabulary knowledge of young children with hearing loss. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-16-0239.

Lund, E., & Schuele, C. M. (2015). Synchrony of maternal auditory and visual cues about unknown words to children with and without cochlear implants. Ear and Hearing, 36, 229-38.

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Publications2019-03-05T18:05:01-06:00

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Research

2019-03-05T18:05:12-06:00

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Research

Vocabulary Development in Children with Hearing Loss

This line of research explores how characteristics of children and their environments contribute to their vocabulary knowledge. Within the CHLLD lab, we have explored how mothers input new words to their children with and without cochlear implants (Lund & Schuele, 2015) and how the timing of auditory and visual input contributes to the words children know (Lund & Schuele, 2017). Most recently, we considered how children contribute to their own word-learning opportunities (Lund, 2018):

Did you know? Children with cochlear implants are less likely to ask about new objects (or toys) than their peers with normal hearing.

Early Literacy in Children with Hearing Loss

This line of research considers how monolingual English and bilingual Spanish-English speaking preschool children with hearing loss develop literacy skills. We have considered how the quantity of vocabulary knowledge relates to phonological awareness development (the sub-conscious awareness that words are made up of individual sounds; Lund, Werfel, & Schuele, 2015).  A current project funded by the NIDCD at the National Institutes of Health considers how quality of vocabulary knowledge in children with cochlear implants relates to phonological awareness development.

Did you know? Children with hearing loss follow different trajectories to develop literacy-related skills than children without hearing loss. Look for our ELLA study to find out more! #ELLAStudy

This line of research investigates how speech-language pathologists can best support parents to be their child’s primary language teacher. In a study funded by the American Speech Language Hearing Foundation, we found that parents of children learn to change their language input to their children in a very short period of time! However, we have more work to do to find out how to help parents maintain those habits over time (Lund, 2018).

Did you know? Children with hearing loss learn words best when those words are tied to other things they already know. For example, eating popcorn while teaching the word “popcorn” is a very effective way to teach that new word!

Parents as Teachers for Children with Hearing Loss

This line of research investigates how speech-language pathologists can best support parents to be their child’s primary language teacher. In a study funded by the American Speech Language Hearing Foundation, we found that parents of children learn to change their language input to their children in a very short period of time! However, we have more work to do to find out how to help parents maintain those habits over time (Lund, 2018).

Did you know? Children with hearing loss learn words best when those words are tied to other things they already know. For example, eating popcorn while teaching the word “popcorn” is a very effective way to teach that new word!

Recruitment Information

We are looking for children with and without hearing loss who are 4, 5, 6, or 7 years old.

Contact: Hearinglosslab@tcu.edu or call 817-257-4450 to participate!

View Publications

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Research2019-03-05T18:05:12-06:00

Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Biography

2019-03-05T18:05:25-06:00

Emily Lund, Ph.D.

Biography

Emily Lund, Ph.D.

Emily Lund, PhD, CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor in the Davies School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Texas Christian University. Dr. Lund earned a Bachelor’s degree in Economics and Spanish, a Master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology, and a Ph.D. in Speech and Hearing Sciences from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. Prior to receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Lund worked as a clinical, bilingual speech-language pathologist in the National Center for Childhood Deafness and Family Communication at the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center.

Dr. Lund’s research investigates the ways that oral language use contributes to spoken and written language learning in monolingual and bilingual children with hearing loss. Her work has been consistently funded by the National Institutes of Health (National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders) and the American Speech Language Hearing Foundation. Dr. Lund received the Fort Worth Business Press Healthcare Heroes Award in 2017 for her work in parent training for children with hearing loss.

Within the Davies School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Dr. Lund teaches the graduate level Research in Communication Sciences and Disorders, undergraduate level Teaching Spoken Language to Children with Hearing Loss, and graduate level Early Intervention course.

Learn more about Dr. Lund’s research by exploring the lab pages.

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Emily Lund, Ph.D. – Biography2019-03-05T18:05:25-06:00

Emily Lund – Overview

2019-03-05T18:05:47-06:00
NOW RECRUITING RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS

OVERVIEW

Welcome to the Childhood Hearing Loss and Language Development Lab at Texas Christian University. We are a part of the Davies School of Communication Sciences and Disorders and affiliated with the Miller Speech and Hearing Clinic. The CHLLD lab is led by Dr. Emily Lund.

So, what does that mean?

Essentially, this is a clinical practice and research laboratory within a university setting. That means that the CHLLD lab has goals related to teaching, to clinical services, and to science.

Teaching: The goal of the Davies School at TCU is to teach undergraduate and graduate students how to be ethical and effective speech-language pathologists. Within the CHLLD lab, our goal is to teach undergraduate and graduate students to work specifically with children with hearing loss (particularly those children who are developing some spoken language skills).

Practically, this translates to the following activities in our lab:

  • CHLLD lab-affiliated faculty (like Dr. Lund) teach classes related to hearing loss and language development, and students complete projects related to understanding the hearing loss-language development connection.
  • Students (undergraduate and graduate) provide clinical speech and language services to children with hearing loss, supervised by CHLLD lab faculty.
  • Students participate in language-based research with children with hearing loss.

Clinical and Community Services: A goal of the Miller Speech and Hearing Clinic is to provide high-quality speech and language services to the Dallas/Fort Worth community. Within the CHLLD lab, we share that goal for children with hearing loss and strive to provide the best possible services and information to families who benefit from these services.

Practically, this translates to the following activities in our lab:

  • The CHLLD lab is able to provide a (limited) number of scholarship-funded spots to children with hearing loss and their families in order to provide parent training to those families.
  • As part of her own line of research, Dr. Lund is able to provide intervention to families who are interested, which results in free speech and language assessments and treatment.
  • CHLLD lab faculty often present information at community events to promote awareness of hearing loss within the community.

Science: As a research laboratory, the CHLLD lab conducts many projects to improve our knowledge of language development in children with hearing loss. Sometimes students initiate and lead those projects, and other times CHLLD lab faculty run these projects.

Practically, this translates to the following activities in our lab:

  • The CHLLD lab is always recruiting children with hearing loss to participate in our studies.
  • We publish papers in the lab to help further professional knowledge about children with hearing loss.

How does this science translate to service and mentorship for students?

From January 2016 to the present:

More than 400 hours of specialized aural-rehabilitation services were provided to children with hearing loss, free of charge.

Twenty-five graduate students received specialized training in intervention for children with hearing loss, with focused mentoring on parent training.

More than 250 hours of free speech, language and literacy testing has been administered to children between the ages of 4 and 7.

Ten undergraduate and graduate students have participated in research related to children with hearing loss to more deeply understand the needs of this population.

Emily Lund – Overview2019-03-05T18:05:47-06:00

Emily Lund Lab

2019-03-05T18:06:01-06:00

Emily Lund, Ph.D.
CHLLD Lab

Research and Clinical Focus: Word learning, emergent literacy, and parent training for children with hearing loss

VIEW LAB PAGE
Emily Lund Lab2019-03-05T18:06:01-06:00